EBCT


EBCT is the acronym for electron-beam computed tomography, the high-speed form of X-ray imaging technology. It's used to evaluate various structures and functions in the heart and to measure calcium deposits in the coronary arteries.

Ebstein's anomaly


Ebstein's anomaly, also called Ebstein's malformation, is a congenital heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is abnormally formed. The tricuspid valve is one of the heart's four valves. It normally swings open to allow the smooth passage of blood from the right atrium to the right ventricle, and then closes. Blood should flow in one direction and only at the right time. The tricuspid valve normally has three "flaps," or leaflets. In Ebstein's anomaly, one or two flaps are stuck to the wall of the heart and don't move normally. Ebstein's anomaly is mild in most adults who have it, but sometimes the tricuspid valve leaks severely enough to result in heart failure or cyanosis. Then surgery may be required.

Ebstein's malformation


Ebstein's malformation, also called Ebstein's anomaly, is a congenital heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is abnormally formed. The tricuspid valve is one of the heart's four valves. It normally swings open to allow the smooth passage of blood from the right atrium to the right ventricle, and then closes. Blood should flow in one direction and only at the right time. The tricuspid valve normally has three "flaps," or leaflets. In Ebstein's malformation, one or two flaps are stuck to the wall of the heart and don't move normally. Ebstein's malformation is mild in most adults who have it, but sometimes the tricuspid valve leaks severely enough to result in heart failure or cyanosis. Then surgery may be required.

ECG


An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) is a quick, painless test that records the electrical activity of the heart including the timing and duration of each electrical phase in a heartbeat. An ECG is the standard clinical tool for diagnosing arrhythmias (abnormal rhythms) and to check if the heart is getting enough blood or if areas of the heart are abnormally thick.

echo


An echocardiogram, also called an echo, is a test that uses high frequency sound waves (ultrasound) to make pictures of your heart. Your doctor may use an echo test to look at your heart’s structure and check how well your heart functions. An “echo” provides valuable information about the health of the heart and abnormal rhythms (arrhythmias).

echocardiogram


An echocardiogram, also called an echo, is a test that uses high frequency sound waves (ultrasound) to make pictures of your heart. Your doctor may use an echo test to look at your heart’s structure and check how well your heart functions. An “echo” provides valuable information about the health of the heart and abnormal rhythms (arrhythmias).

echocardiography


An echocardiography is a diagnostic method in which a handheld device is placed on the chest and high-frequency sound waves produce images of the heart’s size, structure and motion. An “echo” provides valuable information about the health of the heart and abnormal rhythms (arrhythmias).

ECST


ECST is the acronym for exercise cardiac stress test, which is also called an exercise stress test, or exercise test, is a test that shows whether the heart's blood supply is sufficient and if the heart rhythm is normal while he or she walks on a treadmill or pedals a stationary bicycle. The test monitors the person's level of tiredness, heart rate, breathing, blood pressure and heart activity while exercising.

edema


Edema is swelling due to an abnormally large amount of fluid in the intracellular body tissue spaces. Edema is common in the legs, ankles and lungs of people with heart failure.

EEG


EEG is the acronym for electroencephalogram, a graphic record of the electrical impulses produced by the brain.

eggs


Animal products, including eggs, contain cholesterol. Too much bad (LDL) cholesterol in the blood can contribute to formation of plaque and the narrowing of the arteries that feed the heart. A medium-size egg has about 185 milligrams of cholesterol, and a large egg has about 215 milligrams. All the cholesterol in eggs is in the yolks. Egg whites without the yolks are a heart-healthy source of protein.

ejection fraction


Ejection fraction is the percentage of blood that is pumped out with each heartbeat. During each heartbeat, the heart contracts and relaxes. The heart never empties all of the blood from the lower chambers, called ventricles. Ejection fraction is usually measured in the left ventricle because it is the heart's main pumping chamber. A normal ejection fraction in a person at rest is typically between 55 and 70 percent. If the heart muscle has been damaged by heart attack, heart muscle disease or heart valve problems, the ejection fraction may be below normal.

EKG


An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) is a quick, painless test that records the electrical activity of the heart including the timing and duration of each electrical phase in a heartbeat. An ECG is the standard clinical tool for diagnosing arrhythmias (abnormal rhythms) and to check if the heart is getting enough blood or if areas of the heart are abnormally thick.

electrode catheter


An electrode catheter is thin, flexible tubing tipped with electrodes that may be threaded through the blood vessels to different locations in the body. It is sometimes used to pace the heart or deliver high-energy shocks.

electroencephalogram


An electroencephalogram, or EEG, is a graphic record of the electrical impulses produced by the brain.

electron-beam computed tomography


Electron-beam computed tomography is the high-speed form of X-ray imaging technology. It's used to evaluate various structures and functions in the heart and to measure calcium deposits in the coronary arteries

electrophysiological testing


Electrophysiological testing is a procedure used to provoke known, but infrequent, arrhythmias and to unmask suspected arrhythmias. Using local anesthesia, temporary electrode catheters are positioned in the heart’s atria and/or ventricles and at strategic locations to record cardiac electrical signals and “map” the spread of electrical impulses during each heartbeat.

embolus


An embolus is a blood clot or other particle that forms in one part of the body, then moves through the bloodstream until it lodges in a narrowed vessel and blocks the flow of blood, causing a heart attack or stroke.

emergency cardiovascular care


Emergency cardiovascular care is the term used to describe urgent diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular emergencies such as cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest, near-drowning, choking and heart attack. These emergencies require immediate attention from bystanders, emergency medical services personnel and/or other healthcare providers. The American Heart Association develops resuscitation and first aid guidelines and training materials through its CPR & First Aid department.

emotional lability


Emotional lability is an effect of stroke in which a survivor cries or laughs or has sudden mood swings for no apparent reason.

endarterectomy


Endarterectomy is the surgical removal of plaque deposits or blood clots in an artery.

endocarditis


Endocarditis refers to inflammation of the heart lining or valves, usually caused by a bacterial infection. Risk for developing endocarditis includes those having had placement of a prosthetic heart valve, previous endocarditis, previous heart valve surgery, abnormal heart valves or certain congenital heart defects. Common symptoms include fever and other flu-like symptoms.

endocarditis prophylaxis


Endocarditis prophylaxis is using antibiotics to prevent endocarditis, which is an infection of the inside lining of the heart (the endocardial lining). Endocarditis, which can involve heart valves and the lining of the heart muscle, is usually caused by a bacterial infection.

endocrinologist


An endocrinologist is a doctor who specializes in treating people with disorders of the endocrine gland, such as diabetes, and other problems such as thyroid diseases and hormonal disorders.

endomyocardial biopsy


An endomyocardial biopsy, also referred to as a myocardial biopsy, is when a small amount of tissue is removed from the internal lining of the heart for testing. An endmyocardial biopsy is used to help diagnose and treat heart muscle disorders and can also detect rejection of the new heart after a transplant.

endothelium


Endothelium is the smooth inner lining of some body structures, including the heart and blood vessels.

enlarged heart


Enlarged heart has no scientific name because it is not a specific condition – rather, a problem caused by another problem. In someone born with an enlarged heart, a congenital birth defect may have caused the change in size. The abnormal size may affect the ability of the heart to function normally. An enlarged heart also can be caused by other conditions, such as heart attack, high blood pressure, abnormal heartbeat and cardiomyopathy (thickening and stiffening of heart muscle). You are at great risk for developing an enlarged heart if you have a family history of heart disease, heart attack or high blood pressure.

enzyme


An enzyme is a complex chemical that can speed up specific biochemical processes in the body.

EPS


Electrophysiology Studies, also also called EP Study. Electrophysiological testing is a procedure used to provoke known, but infrequent, arrhythmias and to unmask suspected arrhythmias. Using local anesthesia, temporary electrode catheters are positioned in the heart’s atria and/or ventricles and at strategic locations to record cardiac electrical signals and “map” the spread of electrical impulses during each heartbeat.

EP Study


Electrophysiological testing is a procedure used to provoke known, but infrequent, arrhythmias and to unmask suspected arrhythmias. Using local anesthesia, temporary electrode catheters are positioned in the heart’s atria and/or ventricles and at strategic locations to record cardiac electrical signals and “map” the spread of electrical impulses during each heartbeat.

estrogen


Estrogen is a hormone produced in a woman's body and tends to raise HDL cholesterol, helping women to have higher levels of "good" cholesterol levels than men. Estrogen production is highest during the childbearing years, which helps explain why premenopausal women are usually protected from developing heart disease.

event recorder


Also called cardiac event recorder. A cardiac event recorder is a battery-powered portable device that you control to tape-record your heart’s electrical activity (ECG) when you have fast or slow heartbeats, or feel dizzy or like you want to faint. It can also be used to see how you respond to medicines.

exercise


The American Heart Association recommends at least 2 hours of moderate-intensity exercise or an hour and 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity excercise a week or a combination of the two. Physical activity is anything that makes you move your body, increase your heart rate and use up energy or calories. Regular physical activity can lower your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. Aerobic exercises such as walking, jogging, swimming or biking benefit y our heart and fitness level as compared to people who are less active.

exercise cardiac stress test


An exercise cardiac stress test, also called an ECST, exercise test or exercise stress test, is a test that shows whether the heart's blood supply is sufficient and if the heart rhythm is normal while he or she walks on a treadmill or pedals a stationary bicycle. The test monitors the person's level of tiredness, heart rate, breathing, blood pressure and heart activity while exercising.

exercise stress test


An exercise stress test requires walking on a treadmill or pedaling a stationary bicycle while connected to equipment to monitor heart rate, breathing, blood pressure, electrical activity of the heart or heart rhythm and how long the physical activity is tolerated without getting too tired. The exercise stress test ? also called a cardiac stress test, treadmill stress test or just stress test ? is used to assess how well the heart responds to physical activity based on observing an electrocardiogram.

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