radionuclide ventriculography or radionuclide angiography (MUGA scan)


Radionuclide ventriculography (RVG, RNV) or radionuclide angiography (RNA) is often referred to as a MUGA (multiple-gated acquisition) scan. It is a type of nuclear imaging test. This scan shows how well your heart is pumping.

re-entry


A re-entry is a type of abnormal conduction in which electrical impulses get caught in a merry-go-round-like sequence. This is a common cause of tachycardias.

regurgitation


Regurgitation, in cardiovascular terms, is when blood leaks back into the heart chamber from which it was pumped because a valve doesn't close properly.

reperfusion therapy


Reperfusion therapy are techniques that restore blood flow to part of the heart muscle damaged during a heart attack, or part of the brain injured during a stroke. It may include clot-dissolving drugs (thrombolysis), balloon angioplasty or surgery.

resident


A resident is a licensed physician completing training in a primary specialty (e.g., pediatrics, surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, etc.).

restenosis


Restenosis is a renarrowing of an artery after a procedure to open it up. (These procedures are known as percutaneous coronary intervention, angioplasty, or stent placement or bypass-grafting surgery.)

resting heart rate


Your resting heart rate is the number of times your heart beats per minute while it's at rest.  Best taken after a good night's sleep, before getting out of bed, the average resting heart rate is 60-80 beats per minute, but it's usually lower for physically fit people.  It also rises with age. The best places to find your pulse are the wrists, the inside of your elbow, the side of your neck and the top of the foot. To get the most accurate reading, put your finger over your pulse and count the number of beats in 60 seconds.

retinopathy


Retinopathy is damage to the blood vessels in the retina

rheumatic fever


Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory reaction that can occur after a streptococcal infection of the throat (strep throat). Most of the time strep throat doesn’t lead to rheumatic fever, but when it does it typically develops two to four weeks later. Symptoms can include sudden onset of a sore throat, especially with painful swallowing, fever, and tender, swollen glands under the jaw. Rheumatic fever is not contagious and can almost always be prevented if strep throat is treated.

rheumatic heart disease


Rheumatic heart disease is damage to the heart, particularly the heart valves, after having one or more attacks of rheumatic fever.

right heart catheteritization


Pulmonary artery catheterization is used to evaluate primary pulmonary hypertension. In the procedure, a thin, flexible tube called a Swan-Ganz catheter is usually inserted in one of the veins in the neck and threaded into the right ventricle and pulmonary artery. This is a common way to measure the pressure in the pulmonary artery and find out what treatment is appropriate. It's also used in critically ill patients to provide continuous monitoring of heart function. It is sometimes called Swan-Ganz catheterization.

right heart ventriculography


A right heart ventriculography is a study of the right chambers of the heart (the right atrium and right ventricle). The test helps physicians measure pressure, oxygen and cardiac output through a thin flexible tube called a catheter. Occasionally, visualizing the right chambers is also necessary. This is done by injecting contrast media (dye) through the catheter into the heart's right side with a rapid succession of X-rays taken to capture images of blood flow.

right sided heart failure


A right-sided heart failure is heart failure caused by damage to the heart's right-sided chambers. This can occur as a result of pulmonary hypertension or left-sided heart failure. When the left ventricle fails, increased fluid pressure is in effect transferred back through the lungs, ultimately damaging the heart's right side. When the right side loses pumping power, blood backs up in the body's veins. This usually causes increase pressure in the neck veins and swelling in the legs and ankles.

right ventricular heart failure


A right-ventricular heart failure is heart failure caused by damage to the heart's right-sided chambers. This can occur as a result of pulmonary hypertension or left-sided heart failure. When the left ventricle fails, increased fluid pressure is in effect transferred back through the lungs, ultimately damaging the heart's right side. When the right side loses pumping power, blood backs up in the body's veins. This usually causes increase pressure in the neck veins and swelling in the legs and ankles.

risk factors


Risk factors are habits or conditions that increase the chances of developing a disease. For cardiovascular diseases, there are seven major modifiable risk factors: smoking, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, unhealthy body weight, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure and high blood sugar. The American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 can help you check your risk factors and make improvements.

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