How is the AHA Addressing Million Hearts: For Consumers

Updated:Jul 22,2014

American Heart Association Tools and Resources to support Million Hearts®

AHA has defined "ideal cardiovascular health," and Life’s Simple 7® is the seven health factors and lifestyle behaviors that support heart health. Life’s Simple 7® includes: blood pressure control, physical activity, cholesterol, healthy diet, healthy weight, smoking status and blood glucose.

My Life Check™ empowers people to take a simple step toward a better life. In just a few minutes, users can get their personal Heart Score and a custom plan with the steps they need to start living their best life.


Heart360® is a health and wellness tracking tool that helps individuals manage their blood pressure to goal, as well as other important heart health factors like cholesterol, glucose, and physical activity, as well as medication adherence. Upon completion of the initial My Life Check™ assessment, consumers can export their results into Heart360®. Heart360® will then allow ongoing tracking and monitoring of a consumer’s health stats as they make progress toward their health goals.

This tool provides users with the opportunity to share their personal heart health record with a healthcare professional or health mentor. Throughout the tool, targeted messaging is presented based on the consumer’s condition and inputs.


With the Heart Attack Risk Calculator, people can determine their 10-year risk of having a heart attack or dying from coronary heart disease and get a report to discuss with their healthcare provider. Users can also discover ways to lower their risk of heart attack. In addition, by registering, users have the ability to view their “History” to see how Blood Pressure, Cholesterol and risk levels changed over time.

*The Heart Attack Risk Calculator is not connected to the 2013 Treatment Guidelines for Professionals


 

How is the American Heart Association addressing the Million Hearts® Priorities?

MH AspirinThe American Heart Association recommendations for people at high risk of heart attack should take a daily low-dose of aspirin (if told to by their healthcare provider) and that heart attack survivors regularly take low-dose aspirin. You should not start aspirin therapy without first consulting your physician.  The risks and benefits of aspirin therapy vary for each person.