Introducing the National Hypertension Control Initiative

It's time to create a healthier, more equitable country

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically highlighted social inequities in health. In response, the American Heart Association is launching a new evidenced-based, community-driven effort to reduce hypertension, or high blood pressure.


Hypertension is a major risk factor for poor health outcomes and mortality among persons from disproportionally impacted racial and ethnic groups.

Let’s help protect the men in our lives

Show up for dad F.A.S.T. Nearly 50% of all adult men have high blood pressure and are at a greater risk for stroke. Monitor your blood pressure regularly to help reduce your risk for stroke.

nurse wearing a mask

Our Challenge

Hypertension and, by extension, COVID-19 hit vulnerable communities harder than others.

  • Almost half of U.S. adults suffer from hypertension, and many don't know they have it.
  • Black and Latinx people are twice as likely to develop hypertension. That disparity can be related to social determinants of health, as well as genetics and other health and environmental issues.
  • The greater risk for hypertension results in more heart attacks and heart disease, including strokes, which contribute to disproportionate negative outcomes for those infected with COVID-19.

Our Strategy

Increase awareness of hypertension and create an effective preventive care system through four overlapping community approaches.

  • Engage the public through outreach and messaging to vulnerable communities regarding risks, self-monitoring techniques and connecting with a healthcare professional to develop a plan for blood pressure management.
  • Collaborate with community organizations to support the community by providing blood pressure education, screenings and encouraging a connection with heath care professionals for blood pressure management. These gathering places may include community-based organizations such as recreation and senior centers, houses of worship and hair salons and barber shops, to name a few.
  • Involve health care professionals by encouraging best practices in clinical settings, particularly at health centers that serve at-risk communities.

Father hugging daughter

Here’s how neighborhoods are taking control of their health

We’re working together to address high blood pressure in under-resourced communities! Listen in to learn how people across the country are making a change in the health of their neighborhoods through collaborative care practices.

If you’re interested in viewing this video in Spanish, please email us at nhci@heart.org to receive a notification when it’s available.

Doctor Conversing with patient

Our goal

Improve health care and save lives in at-risk communities, which are most affected by hypertension and COVID-19.

  • Increase blood pressure control by working in tandem with community members, businesses and organizations and Community Health Centers across the country to remove barriers and improve health for vulnerable populations.

For questions about the National Hypertension Control Initiative, please email us at nhci@heart.org.

Community Health Center Resources

Is your health center part of the National Hypertension Control Initiative’s group of HRSA funded Community Health Centers?

How To Monitor Your Blood Pressure at Home

Whether you’re learning how to self-measure your blood pressure at home or if you’re bringing this information to your community, we’ve got you covered. Use these resources to find the right information for you. 

Sign up to learn how to get involved

Join us as we create new paths to community health, starting with blood pressure control! We’re calling on community members, organizations, businesses and others to collaborate with us as we work to enrich the lives of our neighbors – together!

man getting his blood pressure taken

This initiative is supported by a cooperative agreement with the Office of Minority Health (OMH) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), as part of a financial assistance award totaling $12.2 million in partnership with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). The contents do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by OMH/OASH/HHS or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit: minorityhealth.hhs.gov.