New Hampshire Go Red For Women Luncheon

  • Updated:Apr 10,2014

Where:

TBD
TBD
Manchester, New Hampshire, 03101
Link to Map

When:

Starts:Mon, 27 Oct 2014 10:00:00 AM
Ends:Mon, 27 Oct 2014 2:00:00 PM
Registration Fee:$75


Purchase tickets and attend the 2014 New Hampshire Go Red For Women Luncheon

The 2014 New Hampshire Go Red For Women Luncheon is a life-changing experience that focuses on three areas to support the fight against heart disease in women, heightening awareness of the issue, creating a passionate call-to-action and generating funds to support education and research. Heart disease is a leading cause of death for women in the United States. Inside every woman is the power to live a longer, stronger life. The American Heart Association's Go Red For Women movement seeks to provide women with the tools and resources they need to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Please join us as we speak up together to beat the No. 1 killer of women. 


Breakout Sessions

Please stay tuned for more information!

Thanks to Our Generous Sponsors

The support of our national and local sponsors help fund American Heart Association educational and awareness programs such as Go Red For Women® as well as critical research that advances the mission to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. We'd like to thank them for all their contributions and time spent to fight this No. 1 killer. Together, our Mission is to save the lives of women.



©2012, American Heart Association. Also known as the Heart Fund.  TM Go Red trademark of AHA, Red Dress trademark of DHHS. ®National Wear Red Day is a registered trademark of HHS and AHA.


For more information contact:
Cheryll Andrews
603-518-1552
cheryll.andrews@heart.org
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We are looking for you to share your talents with us! Volunteer with your New Hampshire American Heart Association today!
New Hampshire Research Saves Lives
When we fund the best science-based research projects, we're funding the fight against heart disease and stroke. See (PDF) what researchers in New Hampshire are learning.