Kansas Initiative for Stroke Survival

Updated:Nov 17,2014

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Kansas State Stroke Task Force
is embarking on the first stage of development for a consistent and dependable Stroke System of Care for the State of Kansas.        

Getting Started
Identification and formalization of the Emergency Stroke Ready facilities and Not Stroke Ready facilities is a necessary step to implementation of the other goals

Emergent Stroke Ready Hospitals
ESRHs
, hospitals that diagnose, treat, and transport acute stroke patients to a higher level of care as warranted, will likely be located throughout the state. ESRHs must annually attest to Kansas State Stroke Task Force their continued compliance with criteria outlined below and must comply with these criteria 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Complete List of Emergent Stroke Ready Primary Stroke Center Hospitals  updated 8.19.13

More information at KISS Education (heart.org/kisseducation)

Kansas Hospital Stroke Map
                View full-size PDF of  map 

 Previous Webinars & Education
5th Annual Kansas STEMI & Stroke Summit
October 9-10, 2014
 
"History of EMS"
Tina York, NREMT-P, HCA Midwest Health Systems
"Use of Action Registry to Improve Quality in Hospitals and EMS"
Kay Brown, AHA/ASA
"Fibrinolytic Therapy for STEMI"
Patricia Howard, Pharm D, The University of Kansas Hospital
"Nursing Care of Stroke Patient: Tips & Tricks for a Great Neuro Exam"
Angela Hawkins, BN, RN, CCRN, CNRN, SCRN, Saint Luke's Hospital Marion Bloch Neuroscience Institute
"Fibrinolytic Therapy in Stroke"
Patricia Howard, Pharm D, The University of Kansas Hospital
"Posterior Circulation in Stroke"
Dr. Colleen Lechtenberg, The University of Kansas Hospital
"EMS - The Critical Link"
Jacki Addington, RN-BSN, CNRN, Tim Cottrell, NREMT-P, CCP-C, HCA Midwest Health
"A Community Alliance: Strengthening Bonds to Save Lives"
Dr. Seshu Rao, Stormont Vail Health Care
"STEMI Recognition"
Cristina Speaks, RN, Angela Welch, RN, Ransom Memorial Hospital; Nick Robbins, MICT, Franklin County EMS
"How to Make Your Community a Heart Safe Community"
Jerilyn Rodgers, RN, MSN, CNL, The University of Kansas Hospital; Christina Barber, EMT, Greeley County Ambulance
 
 
Burden of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Kansas
(July 2010)


 
Kansas Initiative for Stroke Survival
2013 Dysphagia White Paper    

2013 Stroke Guidelines   

2013 Alignment between Emergency Physicians & the ASA Guidelines

Emergent Stroke Ready Data Collection Tool
EMS Resources
Activase (tPA) Information
Background Articles
Hospital Attestation Form

         Download Attestation Form

         Download Re-Attestation Form  

NIH Stroke Scale Resources
Stroke Orders / Protocols and Best Practices
If you have trouble opening the Word template,
try clicking ok several times or use the PDF.
American Stroke Association Stroke Toolbox

Stroke Educational; Resources / Webinar
Focus On Quality

The three initial steps to the KISS plan include: 
  1. Creation of a comprehensive “stroke capability” map for the state of Kansas including:  Air Ambulance (fixed wing and rotor); local & regional EMS; Comprehensive Stroke Centers; Primary Stroke Centers, Emergent Stroke Ready facilities & Not Stroke Ready facilities. 

    a. Air Ambulance and Regional EMS services can easily be identified.
    b. Primary Stroke Centers are those centers who are certified for The Joint Commission, HFAP or DMV. 
    c. Certified Comprehensive Stroke Centers do not yet exist – but will in the near future. 
    d. Emergent Stroke Ready Facilities & Not Stroke Ready facilities need to be determined. 
     
  2. Establishment of Regional Stroke Treatment & Transport Protocols that support the available medical resources.  
     
  3. Implementation of a statewide educational program promoting Stroke Warning Signs and use of 911. 

Emergent Stroke Ready Hospitals
ESRHs
, hospitals that diagnose, treat, and transport acute stroke patients to a higher level of care as warranted, will likely be located throughout the state. ESRHs must annually attest to Kansas State Stroke Task Force their continued compliance with criteria outlined below and must comply with these criteria 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

ESRH designation criteria include:

  • Written emergent stroke care protocols;
  • Written transfer agreement with a hospital with neurosurgical expertise;
  • Director of stroke care to oversee hospital stroke policies and procedures. This may be a clinical staff member or the designee of the hospital administrator;
  • Administration of thrombolytic therapy (e.g. tPA);
  • Ability to conduct brain image tests (e.g. CT scan) at all times;
  • Ability to conduct blood coagulation studies at all times; and
  • Use of the Get with the Guideline – Stroke quality improvement program.  

Kansas Initiative for Stroke Survival

For more information contact:

Kay Brown, CSSBB
American Heart Association
Director, Quality and System Improvement
Kansas City, Kansas and Nebraska
(913) 652-1916 (office)

 

Stroke Warning Signs

If you or someone with you has one or more of these signs, don't delay!
  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause

 

Immediately call 9-1-1 or your emergency response number so an ambulance (ideally with advanced life support) can be sent for you. Also, check the time so you'll know when the first symptoms appeared. It's very important to take immediate action. If given within three hours of the start of symptoms, a clot-busting drug called tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) can reduce long-term disability for the most common type of stroke. tPA is the only FDA-approved medication for the treatment of stroke within three hours of stroke symptom onset.

TIA, or transient ischemic attack, is a "warning stroke" or "mini-stroke" that produces stroke-like symptoms but no lasting damage. Recognizing and treating TIAs can reduce your risk of a major stroke. The usual TIA symptoms are the same as those of stroke, only temporary. The short duration of these symptoms and lack of permanent brain injury is the main difference between TIA and stroke.